Archive for “2015”

A MESSAGE FROM BISHOP CAMPBELL 5/24/2015

2015 BISHOP’S ANNUAL APPEAL

A MESSAGE FROM BISHOP CAMPBELL

 

My dear brothers and sisters in Jesus Christ:

Every disciple of our Lord Jesus eagerly awaits His return in glory at His second coming, when our Lord will bring all things to their fulfillment and gather His faithful into the Kingdom of heaven. While we await that great day, there is work with which the Lords entrusts us here on earth. For this reason, we have made our motto for this year’s Bishop’s Annual Appeal, “Until He Comes Again, This Is Our Work.”

For servants of the Lord there is much to do. The Gospel needs to be proclaimed, the saving sacraments administered, the poor and needy attended to, the sick healed, the grieving consoled, the young educated, families nourished, and vocations encouraged.

As members of the Body of Christ, we are first a people of worship, remembering the saving gifts of God, rejoicing in Christ’s presence, and offering God thanksgiving. From our worship, we then become a people of action, for in a profound sense, we are the eyes and ears and hands of Christ to continue His work. Acknowledging with gratitude the many gifts the Lord has given us, we are moved to share them with others. Touched by the gracious hand of God, we extend our hands and voices to others in Christian love and companionship.

Your generous contribution to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal allows the Church in the Diocese of Columbus to fulfill this sacred and necessary work. Your financial support funds the many ministries and services of our Diocese to aid the poor and needy, to assist parents in educating their children in our schools and religious education programs, to prepare seminarians for priestly service, to encourage vocations to the consecrated life, to nourish Christian marriage and family life, and to protect and enhance human life at every stage.

As I have continued to travel around the parishes in the twenty-three counties of our Diocese, I have encountered your wonderful faithfulness, Christian hospitality, and commitment to the life and mission of the Church. Throughout the ten years in which I have been your bishop, your generosity has allowed the Bishop’s Annual Appeal to exceed its goal every year. For this generosity I am deeply grateful. Your contribution witnesses to a good and faithful stewardship of everything that our Lord has provided for us and demonstrates a desire to assure that all others share in this outpouring of God’s love.

Thank you for your generosity and support. May the good Lord continue to sustain you and bless you, your families and all who are dear to you.

~Most Rev. Frederick F. Campbell, Bishop of Columbus

5/30/2015 Lectio Divina

Saturday, May 30 ~ Eighth Week of Ordinary Time

 

Holy Gospel: Mark 11:27-33 Jesus and his disciples returned once more to Jerusalem. As he was walking in the temple area, the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders approached him and said to him, “By what authority are you doing these things? Or who gave you this authority to do them?” Jesus said to them, “I shall ask you one question. Answer me, and I will tell you by what authority I do these things. Was John’s baptism of heavenly or of human origin? Answer me.” They discussed this among themselves and said, “If we say, ‘Of heavenly origin,’ he will say, ‘Then why did you not believe him?’ But shall we say, ‘Of human origin’?”– they feared the crowd, for they all thought John really was a prophet. So they said to Jesus in reply, “We do not know.” Then Jesus said to them, “Neither shall I tell you by what authority I do these things.”

 

Meditation: Many religious leaders took offense at Jesus because they could not accept his authority. After Jesus had dramatically cleansed the temple of the traders and money-changers the Jewish leaders question Jesus to trap him.  If he says his authority is divine they will charge him with blasphemy.  If he has done this on his own authority they might well arrest him as a mad zealot before he could do more damage.  Jesus, seeing through their trap, poses a question to them and makes their answer a condition for his answer. Jesus told his disciples that “the truth will make you free” (John 8:31).  Do you know the joy and freedom of Christ’s rule in your life?

 

Prayer: Grant us, O Lord, we pray, that the course of our world may be directed by your peaceful rule and that your Church may rejoice, untroubled in her devotion. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Contemplation: Knowing that the laws of God and the teachings of Christ and his Church will truly set me free, do I fully embrace these timeless truths – challenging as they may be because they may be contrary to what our society says is okay to do, or what some human legislative body or what the Supreme Court says is legal to do? Do I embrace the false teachings and fads of our society because I choose not to be challenged by God’s laws, Christ’s teachings, and the teachings of the one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church?  A fundamental question, and one that each of us must answer honestly – the eternal life of our souls are at stake.  Jesus invites us always to follow him.  Do you follow him?

 

 

 

Scripture passages (NAB translation) courtesy of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops;

prayers are from The Roman Missal, Catholic Book Publishing, 2011;

information about saints, solemnities, feasts and memorials courtesy of Catholic Culture.

frlumpe:2015

 

 

5/29/2015 Lectio Divina

Friday, May 29 ~ Eighth Week in Ordinary Time

 

Holy Gospel: Mark 10:46-52 As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a sizable crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind man, the son of Timaeus, sat by the roadside begging. On hearing that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent. But he kept calling out all the more, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take courage; get up, Jesus is calling you.” He threw aside his cloak, sprang up, and came to Jesus. Jesus said to him in reply, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man replied to him, “Master, I want to see.” Jesus told him, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.” Immediately he received his sight and followed him on the way.

 

Meditation: The incident in today’s gospel reveals something important about how God interacts with us. The blind man was determined to get Jesus’ attention and he was persistent in the face of opposition. Jesus could have ignored or rebuffed him because he was disturbing his talk and his audience. Jesus showed that acting was more important than talking. This man was in desperate need and Jesus was ready, not only to empathize with his suffering, but to relieve it as well. A great speaker can command attention and respect, but a man or woman with a helping hand and a big heart is loved more. Jesus commends Bartimaeus for recognizing who he is with the eyes of faith and grants him physical sight as well. Do you recognize your need for God’s healing grace and do you seek Jesus out, like Bartimaeus, with persistent faith and trust in his goodness and mercy?

 

Prayer: Grant us, O Lord, we pray, that the course of our world may be directed by your peaceful rule and that your Church may rejoice, untroubled in her devotion. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Contemplation: At one time or another we’ve all encountered what we perceive to be a “once in a life-time opportunity” that we simply can’t pass up.  Such a moment came for a blind and destitute man, named Bartimaeus. He was determined to get near the one person who could meet his need. He knew who Jesus was and had heard of his fame for healing, but until now had no means of making contact with the Son of David, a clear reference and title for the Messiah. It took a lot of “guts” and persistence for Bartimaeus to get the attention of Jesus over the din of a noisy throng who crowded around Jesus as he made his way out of town. Why was the crowd annoyed with the blind man’s persistent shouts? He was disturbing their peace and interrupting Jesus’ discourse. It was common for a rabbi to teach as he walked with others. Jesus was on his way to celebrate the Passover in Jerusalem and a band of pilgrims followed him. When the crowd tried to silence the blind man he overpowered them with his emotional outburst and thus caught the attention of Jesus.

5/28/2015 Lectio Divina

Thursday, May 28 ~ Eighth Week in Ordinary Time

 

Holy Gospel: Mark 10:46-52 As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a sizable crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind man, the son of Timaeus, sat by the roadside begging. On hearing that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.”  And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent. But he kept calling out all the more, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.”  So they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take courage; get up, Jesus is calling you.” He threw aside his cloak, sprang up, and came to Jesus. Jesus said to him in reply, “What do you want me to do for you?”  The blind man replied to him, “Master, I want to see.” Jesus told him, ‘Go your way; your faith has saved you.” Immediately he received his sight and followed him on the way.

 

Meditation: The incident in today’s Gospel reveals something important about how God interacts with us. Notice how the blind man Bartimeaus was determined to get Jesus’ attention and he was persistent in the face of opposition. Jesus could have ignored or rebuffed him because he was disturbing his talk and his audience. Jesus showed that acting was more important than talking. This man was in desperate need and Jesus was ready, not only to empathize with his suffering, but to relieve it as well. A great speaker can command attention and respect, but a man or woman with a helping hand and a big heart is loved more. Jesus commends Bartimaeus for recognizing who he is with the eyes of faith and grants him physical sight as well. Do you recognize your need for God’s healing grace and do you seek Jesus out, like Bartimaeus, with persistent faith and trust in his goodness and mercy?

 

Prayer: Grant us, O Lord, we pray, that the course of our world may be directed by your peaceful rule and that your Church may rejoice, untroubled in her devotion. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Contemplation: Have you ever found yourself in what you perceived at that moment in time to be that once-in-a-lifetime opportunity you knew you just could not pass up? Such a moment came for the blind man, Bartimaeus. He was determined to get near the one person who could help him. He knew who Jesus was and had heard of his fame for healing, but until now had no means of making contact with the Son of David, a clear reference and title for the Messiah. Do you seek out Jesus, perhaps not on the level of Bartimaeus, but do you seek out Jesus to help you in your time of need?  To ask for his divine wisdom, to bolster your faith? To give you direction, or to help you with a particular challenge?  If not, why not?

5/27/2015 Lectio Divina

Wednesday, May 27 ~ Eighth Week in Ordinary Time

Saint Augustine of Canterbury, Bishop

 

Holy Gospel: Mark 10:32-45  The disciples were on the way, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus went ahead of them. They were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. Taking the Twelve aside again, he began to tell them what was going to happen to him. “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death and hand him over to the Gentiles who will mock him, spit upon him, scourge him, and put him to death, but after three days he will rise.” Then James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him, ‘Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” He replied, ‘What do you wish me to do for you?” They answered him, “Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left.” Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Can you drink the chalice that I drink or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?” They said to him, ‘We can.” Jesus said to them, “The chalice that I drink, you will drink, and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give but is for those for whom it has been prepared.” When the ten heard this, they became indignant at James and John. Jesus summoned them and said to them, “You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all. For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

 

Meditation: Why must the Messiah be rejected and killed?  Did not God promise that his Anointed One would deliver his people from their oppression and establish a kingdom of peace and justice? Jesus paid the price for our redemption with his blood. Slavery to sin is to want the wrong things and to be in bondage to destructive desires. The ransom Jesus paid sets us free from the worst tyranny possible– the tyranny of sin and the fear of death. Jesus’ victory did not end with death but triumphed over the tomb.  Jesus defeated the powers of death through his resurrection. We should want the greatest freedom possible – the freedom to live as God truly meant for each of us to live, and not live the way the secular world entices us to live.

 

 

 

Prayer: O God, who by the preaching of the Bishop Saint Augustine of Canterbury led the English peoples to the Gospel, grant, we pray, that the fruits of his labors may remain ever abundant in your Church. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Contemplation: A disciple must be ready to lay down his or her life in martyrdom and be ready to lay it down each and every day in the little and big sacrifices required. Remember, to serve is to reign with Christ. We share in God’s reign by laying down our lives in humble service as Jesus did for our sake. Are you willing to lay down your life and to serve others as Jesus did?

5/26/2015 Lectio Divina

Tuesday, May 26 ~ Eighth Week in Ordinary Time

Saint Philip Neri, Priest

Founder, The Institute of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri

 

Holy Gospel: Mark 10:28-31  Peter began to say to Jesus, ‘We have given up everything and followed you.” Jesus said, “Amen, I say to you, there is no one who has given up house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or lands for my sake and for the sake of the Gospel who will not receive a hundred times more now in this present age: houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions, and eternal life in the age to come. But many that are first will be last, and the last will be first.”

 

Meditation: What’s the best investment you can make with your life? The gospel presents us with a paradox: we lose what we keep, and we gain what we give away. When we lose our lives for Jesus Christ, we gain a priceless treasure and an inheritance which last forever. Whatever we give to God comes back a hundredfold. Generosity flows from a heart full of gratitude for the abundant mercy and grace which God grants. Do you give freely and generously? Do you support the mission of your parish church? And why do you give, for reward or for love?

 

Prayer: Father, you continually raise up your faithful to the glory of holiness. In your love kindle in us the fire of the Holy Spirit who so filled the heart of Philip Neri. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Contemplation: We should not be surprised if we lose favor or experience ridicule, intimidation, and injury when we take a stand on the side of truth, recognizing there are moral absolutes. In place of material wealth, Jesus promised his disciples the blessing and joy of rich fellowship with the community of believers. The Lord wants to fill our hearts with the vision of heaven and with his joy and peace. Do you know the joy of following the Lord as his disciple?  Do you pray that the Holy Spirit will fill you with the joy of the Gospel and the knowledge of God’s personal love?

 

5/25/2015 Lectio Divina

“A Christian without memory is not a true Christian but only halfway there: a man or a woman, a prisoner of the moment, who doesn’t know how to treasure his or her history, doesn’t know how to read it and live it as salvation history. With the help of the Holy Spirit, however, we are able to interpret interior inspirations and life events in light of Jesus’ words. And thus, within us grows the knowledge of memory, knowledge of the heart, which is a gift of the Spirit. May the Holy Spirit rekindle the Christian memory within all of us! And there that day with the Apostles was our Lady of Memory, who from the beginning meditated on all those things in her heart. Mary, our Mother, was there. May she help us on this path of memory. The Holy Spirit teaches us, reminds us, and — another aspect — lets us speak, with God and with men. There are no muted Christians, mute of soul; no, there’s no place for this.”

–Pope Francis, Pentecost Sunday homily excerpt, June 8, 2014

 

Monday, May 25 ~ Eighth Week in Ordinary Time

Saint Bede the Venerable, Priest and Doctor of the Church

 

Holy Gospel: Mark 10:17-27  As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up, knelt down before him, and asked him, “Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus answered him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: You shall not kill; you shall not commit adultery; you shall not steal; you shall not bear false witness; you shall not defraud; honor your father and your mother.” He replied and said to him, “Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth.” Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him, “You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” At that statement, his face fell, and he went away sad, for he had many possessions. Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, “How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the Kingdom of God!” The disciples were amazed at his words. So Jesus again said to them in reply, “Children, how hard it is to enter the Kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for one who is rich to enter the Kingdom of God.” They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves, “Then who can be saved?” Jesus looked at them and said, “For men it is impossible, but not for God. All things are possible for God.”

 

Meditation: When Jesus challenged the man to make God his one true possession and treasure, he became dismayed.  Why did he go away with sadness rather than with joy?  His treasure and his hope for happiness were misplaced. He sought happiness and security in what he possessed rather than in who he could love and serve and give himself in undivided devotion. Why should Jesus call his disciples to “sell all” for the treasure of his kingdom? Treasure has a special connection to the heart, the place of desire and longing, the place of will and focus. The thing we most set our heart on is our highest treasure. The Lord himself is the greatest treasure we can have. Focusing on the treasures to be gained from God and not on the things of this earth is our greatest joy. Selling all that we have could mean many different things–letting go of attachments, friendships, influences, jobs, entertainments, styles of life–really anything that might stand in the way of our loving and following God first and foremost in our lives.

 

Prayer: O God, who bring light to your Church through the learning of the Priest Saint Bede, mercifully grant that your servants may always be enlightened by his wisdom and helped by his merits. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Contemplation: What earthly treasures do I possess that captures my heart, my time, my resources?  Do these prevent me from loving God as fully as I can?  If so, what treasures must I “sell” – give up – in order that I may devote my attention and my love to God, who makes all things possible?

From the Rector 5/24/2015

ON PENTECOST SUNDAY the Holy Spirit worked a miracle in each of the apostles, and through them, in the whole Church. As the apostles were huddled together around Mary in the Upper Room 50 days after Jesus rose from the dead, suddenly from heaven there was the sound like the rush of a driving wind that filled the entire upper room. The Holy Spirit came down upon them as tongues of fire — tongues because they were to speak, fire because they were to speak with the passion of burning love. And they responded. Jesus had promised that the Holy Spirit he would send would teach them all things, lead them to all truth, remind them of everything he had taught them, and prove the world wrong about sin, holiness and judgment. Then, helped in this way by the Holy Spirit, they began to fulfill this mission. The Acts of the Apostles had begun. The Church was born. Folks, the Church is still alive and the Acts of the Apostles continues down to our own day. God wants to write new chapters, with each of us playing an important role. The wind is still blowing. The fire of the Holy Spirit still burns. Each of us, however, needs to let the Holy Spirit in to do His work. Each of us has to allow the Holy Spirit to bring about a similar miracle in us. We know what our mission is — to give witness to the whole world that Jesus is the Savior, that He is the truth worth living for and worth dying for. Proclaiming the Gospel today is surely not easy; so many reject Christ and His teachings and the Church He founded. But when we look back to what the first disciples encountered — when first the Jewish leaders and eventually the Roman authorities were trying to kill them for proclaiming the Gospel, and when the culture was even more imbued by practices contrary to the Gospel than it is now — we find great reason for hope. For if the Holy Spirit could work such wonders with those coarse fishermen and tax collectors, then surely he can do similarly great things through us if we allow Him. With the help of the Holy Spirit, we, too, can turn from cowards to heroes, from apostates to apostles, from sinners to saints. The key is allowing the Holy Spirit to act in us and through us! May we be aflame with the same Spirit poured out upon the Apostles on Pentecost.

 

GOOD-BYE AND THANK YOU KELLY DOMAN, our Director of Music at Holy Cross, whom I got to know as Pastor of Saint Catharine of Siena Parish where she and her family are members. Kelly’s husband landed a job in Pittsburgh and they are moving there to begin a new chapter in their lives; this is her last weekend with us.  From all of us we thank Kelly for her tremendous work at Holy Cross, and pray that she and her family enjoy a wonderful new life!